Keeping Older Adults Driving Safely: A Research Synthesis of Advanced In-Vehicle Technologies: A LongROAD Study

This report synthesizes the knowledge about older drivers and advanced in-vehicle technologies, focusing on three areas: use, perception, and outcomes.

December 2015

Suggested Citation

For media inquiries, contact:

Tamra Johnson
202-942-2079
TRJohnson@national.aaa.com

Authors

David W. Eby

Lisa J. Molnar

Liang Zhang

Renee M. St. Louis

Nicole Zanier

Lidia P. Kostyniuk

Abstract

This report synthesizes the knowledge about older drivers and advanced in-vehicle technologies, focusing on three areas: use (how older drivers use these technologies), perception (what they think about the technologies), and outcomes (the safety and/or comfort benefits of the technologies).

Keeping Older Adults Driving Safely: A Research Synthesis of Advanced In-Vehicle Technologies

Background

  • As the aging population continues to grow, the personal automobile will increasingly be the preferred mode of personal mobility.
  • Advanced in-vehicle technologies have been proposed as potential ways to keep older adults driving for as long as they can safely do so, by taking into account the common declines in functional abilities experienced by older adults.

Objective

  • The purpose of this report was to synthesize the knowledge about older drivers and advanced in-vehicle technologies, focusing on three areas: use (how older drivers use these technologies), perception (what they think about the technologies), and outcomes (the safety and/or comfort benefits of the technologies).

Methods

  • A systematic literature review was conducted on previously published studies on the 16 technologies most likely to benefit older drivers.
    • Many types of research methods were represented, including: questionnaires, focus groups, structured interviews, crash record analysis, naturalistic driving, and simulated driving studies.
    • Included studies of drivers of all ages for technologies with limited
      literature.
  • Three categories of systems were assessed: crash avoidance, in-vehicle information, and other (ex: adaptive cruise control, drowsiness/fatigue warnings).
  • Articles were identified through a comprehensive search of bibliographic databases and reviewed for appropriateness; 298 articles met the inclusion criteria.

Key Findings

  • The technologies studied have varying degrees of usability and value for older adult drivers, the highest of which are featured in a table.

Conclusions

  • Advanced in-vehicle technologies can help extend the period over which an older adult can drive safely.
  • Vehicle manufacturers, dealers, and others need to explore new ways of training drivers to use in-vehicle systems.

Table 1 Table 2

Suggested Citation

For media inquiries, contact:

Tamra Johnson
202-942-2079
TRJohnson@national.aaa.com

Authors

David W. Eby

University of Michigan Transportation Research Institute and the ATLAS Center

Lisa J. Molnar

University of Michigan Transportation Research Institute and the ATLAS Center

Liang Zhang

University of Michigan Transportation Research Institute and the ATLAS Center

Renee M. St. Louis

University of Michigan Transportation Research Institute and the ATLAS Center

Nicole Zanier

University of Michigan Transportation Research Institute and the ATLAS Center

Lidia P. Kostyniuk

University of Michigan Transportation Research Institute and the ATLAS Center